Jump to content

Recommended Posts

It all started with a search for call blockers and the requirement to have a caller display on wired landline phones, thats when it came to light that by 2025 the BT type telephone master socket will be killed off and the landline service will be fed by the Broadband Service providers hub, leaving those without Broadband devoid of a landline connection, plus a totally dead phone in a power cut or Broadband fault for others, so out of curiosity I selected a lovely BT wired phone, all singing and dancing with call blocker, answer phone & all the bells and whistles I would want and asked the question, will it still work after 2025, the answer was a resounding 'NO', plus all my present extension sockets would also be redundant. Aint progress wonderful

Edited by granpa
Link to post
Share on other sites

I had not heard about this until now, gives us all something else to worry about. It is explained in this BBC report https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-58233420 . It explains why when trying to get fibre to our house we have been told our land line would be lost so would only get broad band. The house is only 6 years old and our part of the estate does not have fibre. Extension sockets in many rooms were put in by the builders, maybe I should fill them in when decorating.

Edited by Paul.H
Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be a wise move to go for a suitable DECT phone system that will work on VOIP, with a base station/answer phone and the satellite phones positioned round the house, only requirement, apart from broadband, would be mains powerpoints, one things for sure, looking at Amazon etc, its not going to be an expensive purchase and the calls will be cheaper, yippee

Link to post
Share on other sites

When our internet is not in use I switch the router off, just like any unused electrical equipment. When we have to change to phones on the internet if I still do the same it will stop unwanted calls and anyone else trying to phone, maybe they might have to send letters instead or arrange phone appointments. Existing phone calls are powered by BT but the change will mean the customer supplying the power, could save BT a bit but if routers need to be on all the time it will not help against climate change. Rural areas like the Lake District might get fibre as a result of the changes, otherwise they could be cut off with mobile phones not working outside towns. Wonder if phone boxes in these areas will disappear ? A brother said the new BT house connections have a grey box that needs a mains power supply.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed, its a bad move, are they really fixing something that isnt broken ? If the net is down or a power failure your only standby is your Mobile phone. Ordered a set of cordless homephones yesterday, these will be my first ones, not counting the mobile, with caller display and call blocking, so will have to get Virgin to turn the Caller ID on. Next problem will be relocating all the phones by mains power points and locating the base station close to my router ready for the changeover when that will be the supply instead of the BT wall boxes

Link to post
Share on other sites

With cordless home phones, I would have thought only one is needed and its base station where it is charged when not in use or in the room you are in. I have a relative (81) who does not have the internet and a mobile phone and another (66) without the internet but has a mobile phone except reception is very poor so it is useless in his house. Should be interesting for them in a few years.

In the areas now in over a week of a power cut have been using their cars to charge their mobile phones according to news reports - petrol or diesel cars, can not be electric ones. Some still have coal fires to keep warm, it is like going back in time.

Edited by Paul.H
Link to post
Share on other sites

Landline type phones will still be used however it will use a digital signal over the old wires previously named a (Landline).

It is actually better for older people because you can choose how many 'Mobile' minutes you want on your former landline tarrif but the old landline will still be used 'fixed' in a property.

Basically it is only the technology that is changing how the phone is used will stay the same with improved coverage of mobile network included included in the Tarriff I get 400 mins a month included in my tariff with BT check out their website and see

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Understood this move was going to abandon the fixed landline which I regard as the copper wire system and put everybody on fibre, hence all the streets being ripped up to get it in place, can  only assume the next move will be to dismantle the old telegraph poles and cables

Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote;

Thousands of Openreach engineers are working to replace Britain’s copper telephone network and kill the landline for good. Their deadline? December 31, 2025. From that moment, landlines for any home or business in Britain will only continue to work if they are hooked up to the internet.

 

“The copper network is still the bread and butter of the UK right now. It served us well during the pandemic, we kept everyone connected on that network,” says James Lilley, director of managed customer migrations at Openreach. “It’s not falling over, but it takes more time and effort to keep it at that standard.” And that effort is quickly becoming too much to bear. With the necessary hardware no longer being manufactured and the skills needed to maintain it no longer being taught, the copper network is running out of time.

When the changeover is complete, it will mark the end of the dominance of landline phone numbers: many will become disused, others forgotten. Older handsets will stop working if they can’t connect to digital exchanges and become relics just like the rotary phone; and some phones will no longer use tone dialing, the musical sound that since the 1960s accompanied the pressing of keys to punch in a phone number.

 

Across the UK, Openreach looks after 192 million kilometres of cables, 110,000 green cabinets, and 4.9 million telephone poles and junction boxes. Replacing copper with fibre will not make the network any smaller, but Openreach hopes it will make it more cost-effective in the long run. That’s after an upfront cost of £12 billion to roll out 1Gbps fibre to the premises (FTTP) to 20 million premises across the country. Openreach plans to reach 25 million by the end of 2026, and has already switched over 5.5 million. To do this, engineers have to go to each exchange, unhook the copper cables and replace them with fibre until they reach 75 per cent coverage. Once they do, they trigger a ‘stop sell’, which means they stop selling products on the copper platform and herd people towards an upgrade to FTTP instead.

Edited by granpa
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...